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May 26, 2005

Denver Post on CEO Blogs

A few weeks ago I had an email conversation with Greg Griffin, a reporter for The Denver Post.  He was writing an article that ultimately was titled "Treading with caution in the blogsphere" and it is published here.  Greg suggests at the end of the article that if an employee writes something the employer doesn't like, they can be fired because in Colorado we are an "at-will employment state."  That's true I suppose but it sure isn't going to help with open communications with those that are left.

Since that article I've thought a lot about what I can and can't really say as a CEO.  I'm certainly going to try to avoid embarrassing anyone with my blog, myself included, unless they really deserve it - myself included.  So at times I may have to speak in more general terms about lessons I've learned as an entrepreneur.

Stephen Baker and Heather Green wrote a very good article in Businessweek on blogs and how they are evolving within business and changing the MSM (Main Stream Media).  It's worth reading if you are trying to figure out what all this blogging stuff is about.

In the end, blogging is just another new form of communications.  It would be interesting to graph the "new forms of communications" through history.  Maybe instead of the "computer revolution" or the "Internet Era" this time in history will be thought of as the "communications revolution".

May 26, 2005 in Blogging | Permalink

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Comments

"Treading with caution" on employee/CEO blogs may be understandable from a legal standpoint, but unfortunate nonetheless.

So many of the breakdowns in communication and morale at the workplace seem to stem from the simple issue of Lack Of Understanding. May sound crunchy-granola, but it clearly happens often (between individuals, departments or business units) to the point of inappropriate competitiveness or downright paranoia. (As in, wait a minute -- aren't we on the same team here?)

Even reading the brief story by your developer had me excited for him (and therefore empathazing with him -- a total stranger). Imagine the potential of that!

Posted by: Laura Quam | Jun 17, 2005 1:05:32 PM

This comic yesterday brought the issue up again. TerryGold.com -- right with the zeitgeist!

http://www.dilbert.com/comics/dilbert/archive/dilbert-20051002.html

Posted by: laura quam | Oct 3, 2005 11:18:08 AM

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